Monthly Archives: October 2011

HP-EMS Profile: Sedgwick County EMS

It has been much more than a month, but we will return to featuring a monthly profile of High Performance EMS sites in order to inspire others to reach beyond just compliant services to provide advanced out-of-hospital care while focusing on improved efficiency.  This time, our spotlight is on Sedgwick County Emergency Medical Service of Kansas.

Sedgwick County EMS

Sedgwick County EMS

The public EMS agency in Sedgwick County is responsible for ALS out-of-hospital care and transportation for both acutely ill and injured patients as well as providing scheduled ambulance transportation services within an area of 1,008 square miles serving a population of approximately 498,000 residents.  In 2010, Sedgwick County EMS responded to 52,815 calls for service.  They are also proud to be part of an elite group of CAAS accredited agencies across the nation signifying that they have voluntarily met the “gold standard” determined by the ambulance industry to be essential in a modern EMS provider.  The CAAS standards, which often exceed those established by state or local regulation, also define High Performance EMS as they are designed to increase operational efficiency and clinical quality while decreasing risk and liability to the organization.

In addition to efficient performance, another hallmark of a High Performance EMS provider is community involvement.  Sedgwick County EMS is a regional BLS Training Center for the American Heart Association teaching CPR classes and frequently participates in local school programs by visiting classrooms to educate children on accessing the emergency system and demonstrating their equipment to make students more familiar with EMS should they ever need to access it.

This past summer, Sedgwick County EMS was selected as a 2011 “Health Care Hero” by the Wichita Business Journal.  The award was given in the health care innovations category which honors a person or organization for breakthroughs in medical technology ranging from research to a new procedure, device or service.  In addition, Sedgwick County EMS received the 2011 advanced life support (ALS) Ambulance Service of the Year award from the Kansas Emergency Medical Service Association (KEMSA) in recognition for promoting EMS in Kansas.  These honors recognize Sedgwick County EMS for the implementation a number of software upgrades that improved automated scheduling, patient care reporting, and deployment practices, among others.

Sedgwick County EMS Director Scott Hadley said in an EMSWorld article this week, “We needed a communications platform and software solution that would support our latest enhancements and upgrades to dispatch and deployment practices, automated scheduling, and patient care reporting for the entire health care system. In Motion Technology and Bradshaw Consulting Services are providing us with the tools we needed to support our mobile healthcare technology to benefit the citizens of Sedgwick County.”

Showing that properly implemented System Status Management can ensure the right response at the right time, Hadley says, “EMS crews have been hitting their goal of getting to destinations in less than nine minutes more than 90 percent of the time for 24 straight months.  That means technology is doing what it’s supposed to do and furthering the mission of the agency.”  Demonstrating the final component of a successful High Performance EMS, Hadley says “it’s our responsibility to continually improve our patient care.”

4 Comments

Filed under Profiles

GIS for EMS

Both acronyms (GIS and EMS) represent not just technologies, but fields of study and service that have very old roots even though each can trace their modern form to research starting in the 1960s.  Both have witnessed explosive growth and application far beyond their original vision.  But most importantly, these two names definitely belong together.

Those who have any knowledge of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will often think first of maps at the mention of its name.  Maps, however, are simply the form GIS professionals use to express the actual work done with a GIS.  That work consists of maintaining a descriptive spatial database and using that database to perform analysis that answers real-world questions or solves domain specific problems.  There are many examples of how it can be applied, but here we will discuss just those in support of Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

At the very simplest end of the spectrum is printed mapbook production.  Because GIS “maps” are stored as data rather than graphics, they are easily edited and symbolized in different ways to meet different objectives.  For use in ambulances, maps should be quick references primarily showing roads (with street names and block addresses) and landmarks essential for navigation.  Street index creation is an automated function of the GIS that can make a printed book of maps more useful for crews attempting to find a specific street.  Better still is an interactive map – one that can locate your current position using GPS and can automatically search an address (a process called “geocoding” or “geovalidation“) and recommend an efficient route between these two points.  This function is manual in printed form but interactively can leverage historic “time-aware” travel impedances (the actual time it takes to travel a certain road segment in a specific direction given the current time of day based on your own past experience) and even access known road closures due to ongoing accidents or scheduled construction to provide realistic travel times and routes given current conditions.  The database can also be used to locate not just the closest vehicle, but make unit recommendations based on additional criteria such as special equipment or training.  When these interactive maps are used with ruggized touch-screen computers or new tablet devices, you have a powerful combination that can also support ePCR charting or other applications.

When a fleet of ambulances can provide positional and status information to the call center, the dispatchers have a better situational awareness of the functioning system in real time.  Then by using additional GIS functionality to map previous incidents, a “hotspot” map (a map showing the areas of highest likeliness for generating a call) can be created to forecast future demand using simple predictive analytics.  In the past, some organizations have poorly implemented a form of System Status Management (SSM) that failed to meet the objective of increasing efficiency and left many paramedics soured on the idea of post moves.  Effective implementations (some highlighted in past blogs here) have shown that Jack Stout’s idea can be properly done in almost any system using modern technology.  Moreover, by positioning ambulances closer to their next call, not only is response time reduced but the incentive to be hasty in that response is also reduced leading to less risk in travel.

Beyond these daily tactical applications of GIS, there are many potential strategic ones.  Preventing a call is better than an emergency response at any speed.  By looking beyond just the calls for service in the coming hour, we can begin to look further into the future and recognize specific risks of target lifestyle groups.  Preventive care or community wellness programs can be directed at the most vulnerable populations to maximize the investment of such a program.  Locating groups with increased potential for cardiac problems can aid in locating a blood pressure screening event as one example.  Some agencies have turned to GIS to help them find new recruits or volunteers.  I encourage you to communicate with your local GIS staff and let them know how they can help you.  After all, assisting you to become more efficient helps them show value as well.  You do not need to know the details behind the analytical tools, it is your existing knowledge of the community and its needs that will help your GIS staff address them.  If you lack those resources locally, or have specific questions, please make a comment below and I will follow up with you directly.

4 Comments

Filed under Technology